What Size MOA Red Dot Should I Buy?

Though it may seem a bit overwhelming at first with how many red dot sights there are to choose from, when it comes down to it, there aren’t really that many differences in red dot and reflex sights. Picking a red dot sight is easier than choosing a magnified riflescope—which can feel like the options are endless. After breaking down a few features, buying a reflex sight should be a simple process.

Red dot or reflex sights range in dot sizes
Red dot or reflex sights range in dot sizes from 1 to up to 8 or 9 MOA.

Red dot and reflex sights are relatively simple and after deciding on how much you want to spend (your budget) and the type of reflex sight you want (open or tube,) which features suit your needs—

size, type of illumination, weight, construction, etc.—it will come down to deciding which size dot is best.

Good for rifles, pistols and shotguns, dot sights are a highly effective aiming tool for CQB, close to medium ranges, competition and self-defense. The biggest advantage of a red dot over any other optic or sight is the ability to acquire and hit a target incredibly quick. The size of the dot directly relates to how quickly you can locate the dot in the unit’s head’s up display and how much target area the dot covers. Both these things can significantly affect your accuracy.

What is MOA?

MOA Red Dot
The smaller the dot, the harder it is to see. The larger the dot, the easier to see but less precise.

The illuminated red or green dot of a red dot/reflex sight is measured in MOA—minutes of angle, a unit for angular measurement of a circle. 1 MOA is equal to 1.047 inches at 100 yards, which we round down to 1 inch. Meaning, the circle (red dot) will appear to be 1 inch in diameter on a target 100 yards out. Therefore, the smaller the dot’s MOA, the harder to see. A larger MOA dot will be incredibly easy to see but may cover too much of the target at further distances to get an accurate shot.

Smaller dots—1 to 2.5 MOA—are used for precise shots at longer distances. 5, 6, 6.5 and larger MOA dots will get you on target faster but will be less precise because the dot will cover a broader area on the target.

Red Dot MOA Size Comparison

1 MOA dots are usually found on “tactical” sights and provide a very precise aiming dot. Yet, those with less than perfect eyesight can struggle with locating the dot, not only on the unit itself but the target as well. To compensate, many 1 MOA red dot sights will be encircled by a larger 60 MOA circle, which also helps with close-range targets. 3, 4, and 5 MOA dots are quicker to acquire due to their larger size and are best for close range targets. Big dots are perfect for speed competition, steel shooting and for those with astigmatism. The most common dot size ranges from 3 to 5 MOA.

2 MOA dot
A 4 MOA dot is best for close ranges, while a 2 MOA dot is best for longer ranges.

3 MOA is probably the most popular dot size for both target shooting and self-defense, as the dot is clear, and accuracy is still precise at both close and mid ranges. Still allowing rapid target acquisition in self-defense range, a 3 MOA red dot with an adjustable brightness feature will aid in accuracy when shooting out farther because smaller dots appear larger on brighter settings. Competitors that require speed prefer bigger dots like 6, 6.5 or even a very large 8 MOA dot. People who use red dots for handguns at close distances also prefer bigger dots.

We designed the Ultra Shot and previous red dot sights with the dot size that was available at the time. Since then, there have been significant advances in optic quality. Our newest models, like the M-Spec, incorporate the most innovative technology available in reflex sights. About five years ago, we asked AR15.com and Sightmark Pro Staff members which types of reticles they preferred. Sightmark Product Development Director Jonathan Horton says, “Most of our red dots are 3 or 5 MOA which is easy to acquire and still have on-target accuracy at 50 or 100 yards, even with a magnifier. Going bigger is good for short range but you’re covering a lot of your target anything over 50 yards.  If we do a smaller aiming dot than 3, it does provide better accuracy out to 100 but we usually design larger circle (circle-dot) around the dot for better acquisition at close range.”

Most shooters purchase a red dot sight for its original intention—quick target acquisition in a self-defense situation. However, turkey hunters and fast-paced competitive shooters also appreciate the accuracy a reflex sight offers. At the end of the day, choosing the size of the illuminated dot reticle depends on your primary use and firearm you need the red dot for.

What dot size do you like and why? Tell us in the comment section.

To learn how to use a red dot sight and read more about their benefits, click here.

Click here to shop Red Dot Sights.

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6 comments

Greetings, Mr. Rego!

You asked for a red dot recommendation for your M&P Shield and Sig P365 pistols. First, you should know that red dots are only mountable on pistol footprints they’re compatible with. Now, if your pistol slides are optics-ready, it’s likely that both the M&P Shield and Sig P-365 will have RMS-C footprints.

If your pistols are optics-ready with this particular cut, I highly recommend the Mini Shot A-Spec M3 Micro or the Mini Shot M-Spec M3 Solar. Both have very long battery lives and auto-brightness reticles that become brighter or dimmer depending on your lighting environment. I sincerely hope I’ve been helpful. Please feel free to ask any questions you might still have!

Sellmark Webmaster

I am looking for a red dot optic for both my older M&P Shield and my Sig P-365. I mostly practice at shorter distances – maybe 20 yards max. I would appreciate any advice. Thanks!

Jon Rego

Here at Sightmark, we believe in catering to our customers’ specific needs. You asked what type of red dot would be good for your Browning BPS 12ga. We recommend the Mini Shot M-Spec FMS Reflex Sight. This compact but powerful reflex sight is larger than a micro red dot but smaller than an ultra shot. It also sits low to the bore, making it perfect for shotguns like yours. This optic is compatible with all Picatinny mounts, but if your rifled barrel has a dovetail sight, we recommend buying an adapter for compatibility.

Sellmark Webmaster

I have a browning BPS 12 guage shotgun with ventilated rib and a second scoped rifled barrel that I use to hunt deer and hogs. Where I live we can hunt turkeys and hogs at the same time. Can you recommend a red dot setup that I can mount to my smoothbore so I can shoot foster slugs and turkey loads? Thanks in advance.

Rmsyer

MOA = Minute of Angle, a measurement of gun accuracy ….. approximately equal to 1" @ 100-yds, 2" @ 200-yds, etc.
Represents the VERTICAL LEG HEIGHT of a RIGHT TRIANGLE that connects at three points …..
(1) the end of the barrel, (2) the target and (3) the spot you aim at vertically to allow for bullet drop
The distance from barrel crown to target is the horizontal leg of the triangle and the distance from the barrel crown to the aiming point is the HYPOTHENUSE of the right triangle..
To solve, the math equation is : TANGENT (TAN) of ANGLE “A” = vertical adjustment needed to allow for bullet drop. TAN “A”= vertical leg / horizontal leg. For a 1 MOA, look up the value of the TAN (1-deg) on the web and you know the distance of the horizontal leg (target distance).. This allows you to calculate the vertical distance => TAN (1-deg) x TARGET DISTANCE.

VaWhitetailHunter76

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