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        Living and Leaving: It’s all About a Legacy

        Living and Leaving: It’s all About a Legacy

        Revelation

        The heat from his little body radiated into mine as beads of sweat raced down his cheeks, mixing with the stream of tears carving their course to the tip of his tiny chin. “Hold me tight, Daddy! Hold me tight! Please, hold me tight!” His pleas filled the room as he continued to sink into me, pulling my arms ever tighter around his chest.

        Finally, the nurse had her sample; with a little luck, we would have our answer within a week. After all, how long should a father have to wait to find out if his son has Leukemia?

        That day I realized there is no lifetime guarantee on tomorrow - what we do today must outlast us. Building my legacy, and helping him begin his own, has become more than just a sappy dad’s goal; it has become the very fabric of our bond.


        Form the fabric of your bond outdoors by teaching your children valuable lessons of love, freedom and heritage.

        Just a few nights after receiving the miraculous news our son had tested negative, I tucked my son in with a kiss and headed toward his doorway.

        “Daddy?” I watched him search his bedroom wall for the right words. “When I get older, can I have your truck?”

        I smiled, “Why do you want daddy’s truck?”

        Still searching the wall, he responded with an answer that took my breath away, “So I can take you hunting.”

        It never dawned on me, what he was taking from our trips to the woods was something he wanted to give back to me; our trips were really something special to him. I hadn’t realized the most precious aspects of my legacy were being formed in the woods. If you’ve ever wondered what your purpose is, keep reading!

        Why on Earth Are We Here?

        Introspection and outdoor observations revealed opportunities as obvious as the blood-trail of a heart-shot hog. Appreciation for life – including wildlife, love, family, freedom, heritage, stewardship, ethics, integrity, conservation, preservation and yes, even death, all play out here upon the majestic stage of our great outdoors.

        The first time my son sat with me in a blind on a hog hunt, we watched several does walk across the field with two fawns in tow.

        “Which one would you shoot, Daddy?”

         “The big doe in front, son.”

        “Why that one?”

        “Because the other two are younger and the one in back has those two fawns to look after.”

        “Why don’t you shoot it then?”

        “It’s not deer season. We have to wait until the season opens.”

        In 30 seconds of conversation, he learned I genuinely love both wildlife and the outdoors. It was a lesson in both ethics and stewardship. He also learned about integrity; he’s heard me say many times, “What you do when no one’s looking is what really matters. That’s the stuff character is made of.”

        He saw my words in action and they stuck like glue.


        Hunting with a McRees Precision .308 rifle and Sightmark Photon digital night vision riflescope.

        Jacob was with me when I caught the biggest bass of my life. You should have seen the look on his face when I pulled the fish from the water. He touched it repeatedly before finally petting it down its slick side. I reveled in his nervous excitement as he watched my entire fist disappear into the fish’s mouth.

        His excitement quickly turned to doom and gloom when I told him to say goodbye as I lowered the bruiser back into the water. “Maybe someone else will get to catch their biggest fish now.” He smiled, “Maybe me?”

        “Maybe so, he’s in there waiting for you to catch him.”

        Purple, gold and scarlet hues of a sleepy sun gave way to silver light dancing on the water as we finished cleaning our fish and stowed our gear. Great memories and another lesson were born; my son understood what giving back to our outdoor heritage is all about.

        The opportunities to teach our children the core values our country was founded upon are endless when you search for them outdoors. Whether you are fishing, hunting, camping or hiking, never lose an opportunity to teach your children lessons, they shape the men and women our children become.

        An Ounce of Reflection


        While hunting together, I’ve taught my son ethics, stewardship and integrity.

        To this day, Jacob’s pleas to hold him tight still haunt me; recalling those few minutes still invokes emotions that are tough to swallow back. Yet, my darkest hour gave way to my greatest awakening; realizing I am not promised another day with my son shattered my someday-soon attitude and replaced it with the hope that my legacy will add to a mosaic of memories and actions serving to build his legacy for what I hope is many, many years to come.

        My son once told me I was his hero. It wasn’t long ago my words echoed his as we sat and hunted together, watching lessons unfold for both of us. Our outdoor world, whether a stone’s throw from suburbia or seemingly endless miles off the grid, is exceedingly special. Out there, in wild places brimming with untamed creatures and still void of man’s industrial “touch”, our legacies grow together.

        And, for this particular dad, the notion that the fabric of his own legacy—woven with mine in those special moments we shared—now veils him in such character there seems little left to teach him, means if tomorrow didn’t come for me, I would be alright with that.

        Scouting the Best Dove Field

        Scouting the Best Dove Field

        By sightmark  

        According to the 2020 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service surveys, some 749,000 hunters harvested approximately 13 million doves, from an estimated population of 63 million birds.”

        An essential step to a successful dove hunt is scouting the best fields.

        If you don’t have a good spot on opening weekend, your chances of success exponentially decrease with each day that passes. Doves respond to hunting pressure and because opening weekend is crowded and the bag limit is high comparingly to other wing hunting, it is inevitable that dove hunting becomes increasingly challenging.

        That is why it is so important to scan your spots a week or two before September 1.

        There is no guarantee that last year’s honey hole, especially if it isn’t yours, will still be the sweet spot. Watering holes dry up, farmers switch or don’t plant crops—they may not have cut their field yet, land development and plenty of other factors affect doves’ feeding, watering and roosting grounds.

        Typically, dove hunting doesn’t require as much preparation as deer hunting does. Most dove hunters wear drab colors, pack up a chair, ammo and a shotgun and post up in the nearest open field. Even though doves are the most bountiful bird in North America, you still run the risk of not hitting your limit that first day—especially if you haven’t done your homework.

        You’re more likely to be successful if you approach your dove hunt like you do deer. An essential step is scouting.

        All you need to scout and scan for this year’s dove field is a car, time and some good binoculars.

        Finding the Best Dove Field

        Doves eat anywhere from 14 to 20 percent of their weight a day. Seeds are their primary diet. They prefer open grain fields, freshly harvested—wheat, barley, corn and sunflower fields are prime feeding grounds. These grain fields edged with tall, sparse dead trees or power lines are where you will find the perch sights doves like. Scan for these entry and exit points because doves use these outlying trees to watch the fields for predators before flying in to feed.

        Watering Holes

        All you need to scout and scan for this year’s dove field is a car, time and some good binoculars.

        Doves typically fly into a water source at least once a day, usually in the evening right before roosting. Like their feeding ground, doves prefer a flat area with a place nearby to perch and watch before committing to flying in to drink.

        Cattle ponds should be easy to find, and the vegetation will already be stomped down. Look for ponds with low banks and sandy areas where it is easy for doves to land and keep watch.

        Timing

        The best time to hunt doves is early morning and right before dusk. However, since this is known to seasoned dove hunters, the fields will empty out from late morning/lunch to mid-afternoon. During this time, you probably won’t have flocks flying in, you’ll spot singles and pairs without the competition of other hunters. If the doves are flying slow, don’t be discouraged. Wait it out. They’ll come back—especially if you’ve already scouted the location.

        When scouting, go at the same time you plan to hunt. This will ensure you have an adequate understanding of when and where the doves are flying and their different flight patterns.

        What Not to Do

        Avoid public, popular fields and sneak off to lesser-known, out-of-the-way places. When doves feel pressure from one field, they will push out to other fields. Public hunting land will fill up fast opening weekend. Don’t be afraid to knock on doors, become friendly with farmers and ask for permission to hunt on private land.

        There is still plenty of time left to scout out the perfect spots. Don’t forget to clean your shotgun and check to make sure your license is current.

        Tell us your dove hunting stories in the comment section.

        Looking for a pair of great binoculars? Click here!

        Accudot Laser Boresights Save You Time and Money!

        Accudot Laser Boresights Save You Time and Money!

        By Sightmark  

        How Do Boresights Help?

        The verdict on laser boresights has been in for quite awhile. They are powerful red laser devices that enable firearm users to quickly sight-in their gun without expending unnecessary time and ammunition.

        It’s important for customers to understand that laser boresights will not ‘zero’ your firearm. Instead, they will ‘boresight’ your firearm. Boresights are excellent for long-range riflescopes and shorter-range red dot optics.

        After chambering a laser boresight, look through your rifle scope (or other optic) and settle the reticle on your target. Then, adjust your windage and elevation turrets until the center of the reticle is aligned with the boresight’s laser. Now your firearm is ‘boresighted’.

        Accudot Packaging

        After this process, the firearm needs to be taken to a range. After removing the boresight, you will fire live rounds, making small adjustments until the center of the reticle is perfectly aligned with where the bullets are actually impacting the target. Once this process in complete, the firearm is ‘zeroed’.

        Again, laser sights will get your accuracy ‘on paper’ and save you tons of money on time and ammunition, but they will not ‘zero’ your firearm alone.

        How Are Accudot Boresights Different?

        Sightmark Accudot boresights are premium boresights made from machined brass. Unlike most boresights, Accudots are rechargeable, so there’s no need to stress about finding AG3 or LR754 batteries. Simply place the Accudot in the charger—then connect to a wall outlet via the provided USB cable—and a few hours later, it’s fully-powered.

        Additionally, Accudots don’t actually ‘power-on’ and emit a red laser until they’re in the chamber and the firearm’s bolt closes. That means the vast majority of the time, when they’re not in use, they’re not using battery power.

        Accudot bore sights are highly power-consumption efficient!

        Which Calibers Are Offered?

        Accudot boresights are offered in several popular calibers.


        Available Accudot Calibers

        For those who love bird hunting and skeet shooting, Accudots are available for 12 gauge shotguns.

        If your primary interest is hunting larger-game animals like deer, pig or varmint, there is a single Accudot available for .30-06, .270 and .25-06, which are some of the most popular hunting calibers in the world!

        For self-defense, target-shooters or competitive shooters, Accudots are available in all the most popular rifle calibers. There is one boresight for .223 and 5.56×45.

        There is another, separate Accudot for .243, .308 and 7.62×54.

        And of course, the most popular pistol caliber in the world—9mm—there is an Accudot for that.

        The Absolute Best Deal in the Industry

        There is not any true competition for Sightmark Accudot Laser Boresights. They save users gobs of time and ammunition, leaving customers with more time at the range, in the bush or wherever their firearm activities take them!

        Accudots are extremely power efficient and are offered in a variety of the most popular calibers in the world.

        And if your Sightmark Accudot Boresight doesn’t perform as expected, it comes with a Lifetime Warranty! After purchasing your Accudot, simply ensure that you register your product and you can rest assured knowing you have the full confidence and backing of Sightmark’s commitment to quality!

        Have you tried Sightmark Accudot Laser Boresights before? How did they perform? Let us know in the comments!

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