Introducing the New Citadel 3-18×50 MR2

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2019/07/11) – Sightmark listened to its customers adding the new Citadel 3-18×50 MR2 riflescope to the Citadel family. The Citadel 3-18×50 MR2 is designed to provide premium performance without denting your wallet. The Citadel 3-18×50 features a first-focal-plane lens system with a versatile illuminated MR2 reticle for mid- to long-range hunting.

The added medium-range MR2 reticle is uncomplicated and easy to use, featuring a red illuminated four-solid post with thin crosshairs and center crosshairs reticle. The reticle’s crosshairs are separated by 1, 0.5 and 0.2 MRAD intervals with 11 brightness settings. The MR2 reticle is simple at low magnification, while still offering the ability to adjust your aim at higher magnifications.

If you are a dealer and would like to speak to someone about pre-orders or becoming a new authorized Sightmark dealer please contact sales@sightmark.com or if you are a media member and would like to test and evaluate please contact mediarelations@sightmark.com.

 

Sightmark Adds 1-10×24 HDR to Citadel Family

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2019/05/16) – Sightmark adds to their premium line of Citadel Riflescopes with the new Citadel 1-10×24 HDR. The newest Citadel offers a second focal plane illuminated hunter dot reticle (crosshairs with center dot) with 11 brightness settings.

The illuminated aiming dot HDR reticle is made for hunting different game.
The HDR Hunter Dot Reticle is made for hunting various game, larger or small.
The newest Citadel offers a second focal plane illuminated hunter dot reticle (cross hairs with center dot) with 11 brightness settings.
The newest Citadel offers a second focal plane illuminated hunter dot reticle (crosshairs with center dot) with 11 brightness settings.

The Citadel 1-10×24 HDR Riflescope (SM13138HDR) features an HDR reticle, 10x optical system, capped low-profile turrets and ½-MOA per click windage and elevation adjustability with a total adjustment range on each axis of 100 MOA. The hunter dot reticle (HDR) provides a wider duplex reticle making it easier to acquire targets quickly.

In addition, it offers premium, fully multi-coated glass for crisp clarity and a 30mm, 6061-T6 aircraft-grade aluminum tube. The Citadel 1-10×24 HDR is IP67 waterproof, dustproof, fogproof and shockproof. Sightmark also includes a throw lever for easy magnification adjustments and front and back flip-up caps.

Citadel Riflescopes: Task Oriented Accuracy… Elevated

The Citadel 1-10x24 features a second focal plane CR1 reticle calibrated for 55-grain .223 ammo.
The Citadel 1-10×24 features a second focal plane CR1 reticle calibrated for 55-grain .223 ammo.

Picking the right scope can seem pretty daunting, especially when the folks around you offer their “expert” opinions, and downright scary when you see some of the price tags. Sticking to a budget is a no brainer. My Pop always quipped, “I don’t care if it’s 20 bucks. If you can’t afford it, it’s no deal… might as well be $2,000.” He said this more than once, in fact, often. While truth certainly lies in “you get what you pay for,” you can get awfully close to unaffordable with very little difference in performance if you pay attention to features, warranty and, of course, the purpose for your purchase.

Riflescopes come at quite a range of pricing, reliability and features, the latter being key. Operating from within your financial arena as foundational to your options, the purpose your prospective riflescope should be the paramount concern. Do you need magnification? What distances do you expect to shoot? Do you expect to use holdovers? Do you prefer MOA, MRAD or perhaps IPHY? Will your riflescope be used for up-close-and-personal target engagement, long-range challenges or mid-range fun? Maybe a bit of a mix?

Sightmark Citadel long-range riflescopes give you more than you pay for in features, quality and clarity.
You get more than what you pay for when you buy a Citadel riflescope.

A perfect example of affordable riflescopes with all the features of high-end optics and a lifetime warranty is the Sightmark Citadel lineup. Citadel riflescopes rise above get-what-you-pay-for optic performance like a fortress on a hill; even better, Citadel scopes deliver big on peace-of-mind with Sightmark’s lifetime warranty and are available in five models, 1-6×24 CR1, 1-10x24CR1, 3-18x50LR1, 3-18×50 LR2 and 5-30×56 LR2, that run the gamut of shooting distances for the lion’s share of recreational plinkers, competitive shooters and long-range precision marksmen.

Citadel 1-6×24 CR1 and 1-10×24 CR1 are tactical-inspired scopes with 24mm objective lenses on 30mm tube platforms. As the Citadel name implies, 1-6×24 and 1-10×24 models include a base magnification of 1x and max of 6x or 10x. With 6x, I can get on target out to 500 yards, even a bit more, quite easily and at 10x, close to 1,000 yards—that may be a stretch for others but, to each their own, as they say. Citadel 1-6×24 and 1-10×24 also feature fine-etched, second-focal-plane, red-illuminated CR1 reticles complete with 11 brightness settings and bullet-drop-compensation, calibrated for 55-grain .223 ammunition with a 100-yard zero, out to 600 yards. Adjustments are MOA with ½-MOA per click windage and elevation, up to 120 MOA total range.

Citadel 3-18×50 LR2 and 5-30×56 LR2 riflescopes are identical, save the magnification ranges and objective lens sizes. Both feature mil-dash first-focal-plane reticles and .1 Mil windage and elevation adjustments. The Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 Riflescope is identical to the 3-18×50 LR2 with one exception, instead of MRAD, the LR1 model is based on MOA, including MOA reticle subtensions and ¼ MOA-per-click windage and elevation turret adjustments.

Click here to shop Citadel riflescopes.

Picture of Sightmark's CR1 first focal plane reticle on the Citadel riflescope.
The Citadel’s CR1 reticle is a first focal plane reticle.

Citadel LR models are designed to take you long-range, even to extreme distances, while base magnifications of 3x or 5x are still comfortable at closer yardage. Designed, however, with long-range shooters in mind, Citadel 3-18×50 and 5-30×56 LR model riflescopes include enhancements most precision marksmen simply won’t consider going without. Those features include hard-anodized 30mm tubes and fine-etched, red-illuminated, first-focal-plane LR1 or LR2 reticles complete with 11 brightness settings, subtension lines and lower-half “Christmas tree” style reference grids, perfect for elevation and windage holdovers. Glass is exceptionally clear and offers razor-sharp fields of view on all Citadel models. Citadel LR model riflescopes are designed to help you get on target out to 1,000 yards and well beyond. Some of that help also comes from fine-tuning your sight picture with adjustable diopter and parallax.

When it comes down to it, you can’t hit what you can’t see—common sense advice I’ve heard, essentially from day one, from parents, mentors and even drill instructors and primary marksmanship instructors alike. With Sightmark Citadel riflescopes, you won’t have that problem; in fact, you’ll even have some extra cash for ammo. What could be better?

Don’t know what type of riflescope you need? Click here to learn more about MIL-Dash vs. MOA

What is the farthest distance you’ve shot? Share your long-range experiences below.

 

Make Your Mark With the new Citadel 1-10×24 CR1 Riflescope!

The Citadel 1-10x24 features a second focal plane CR1 reticle calibrated for 55-grain .223 ammo.
The Citadel 1-10×24 features a second focal plane CR1 reticle calibrated for 55-grain .223 ammo.

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2019/02/21) – Sightmark expands the premium line of Citadel Riflescopes with the addition of the Citadel 1-10×24 CR1 Riflescope. Designed for competition shooters, close- to mid-range hunting and law enforcement, the Citadel is packed with features to bring shooters to the next level traditionally sought by top-tier shooters.

The Citadel 1-10×24 CR1 Riflescope (SM13138CR1) comes complete with all the same features that the Citadel family offers like a fine-etched, red-illuminated reticle with 11 brightness settings. In addition, they feature premium, fully multi-coated glass for crisp clarity and a 30mm, 6061-T6 aircraft-grade aluminum tube, and are IP67 waterproof, dustproof, fogproof and shockproof.

The Citadel 1-10×24 features a second focal plane CR1 reticle calibrated for 55-grain .223 ammunition, capped low-profile turrets and ½-MOA per click windage and elevation adjustability with a total adjustment range on each axis of 100 MOA.

Sightmark Adds to the Citadel Family

Sightmark Citadel long-range riflescopes give you more than you pay for in features, quality and clarity.

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2019/01/23) – Sightmark expands the Citadel riflescope family with the addition of the Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 riflescope. This premium riflescope is designed for hunters, medium-to-long range shooting, competition shooters and law enforcement.

The Citadel 3-18x50 LR1 reticle features ¼ MOA click adjustments at 100 yards and a first focal plane reticle.
The Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 reticle features ¼ MOA click adjustments at 100 yards and a first focal plane reticle.

The Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 (SM13039LR1) features a 6x optical system giving you a wide magnification to shoot medium-to-long range, fully multi-coated lens system, exposed pop-up locking turrets and a red illuminated reticle with 11 brightness settings for contrast against targets. The Citadel is IP67 waterproof, shockproof, dustproof, fogproof and comes complete with flip-up covers, throw lever and a sunshade cover.

A reticle widely used in shooting sports across North America, a first focal plane reticle means the dimensions of the reticle are true to any magnification, thus range finding and performing holdovers can be done at any magnification. The Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 reticle features ¼ MOA click adjustments at 100 yards.

Mil-Dash V. MOA Riflescopes

What Happens in a Riflescope… MATTERS

Years ago, I learned (the hard way) just how important the features on your riflescope really are when it comes to long-range shooting. Granted, when you’re shooting just a few hundred yards, you have some leeway when it comes to the reticle plane, the reticle itself, tracking, return to zero, chromatic aberration, etc.; however, there isn’t much room at all for a compromise on any of these features as you extend your distance game.

The author, Kevin Reese shooting a precision rifle long-range with a Sightmark first-focal plane riflescope
My money is on a first-focal-plane system for long range… and for me, the Mil (MRAD) adjustment and reticle system.

I was asked to field-test an optic from 100 to 1,000 yards. The problem was, the optic was completely ill-prepared to handle any long-range work and barely accomplished mid-range shooting at just 600 yards. While the riflescope was touted as a long-range optic on a 6-24×56 and 30mm tube platform, the nuts-and-bolts features included a red/green illuminated mil-dot second-focal-plane reticle and 1/4-MOA per click windage and elevation turret adjustments, as well as adjustable parallax and diopter.

I assure you, it’s easy to create a mess when you begin with messy parts. There was little (actually nothing) to like about an optic that, itself, was a contradiction. Some things should never be mixed—beer and whiskey, water and gasoline… MOA and milliradian. Consider the latter. In our shooting world, while minute-of-angle (MOA) is 1.047 inches at 100 yards and usually adjustable at 1/8- or 1/4-MOA per click, a milliradian (Mil or MRAD) measures 3.6 inches at 100 yards and is most often adjustable at increments of .1 Mil. As examples, we’ll consider the most popular—1/4-MOA and .1 Mil.

Adjusting ¼-MOA per click moves you approximately .26-inch. at 100 yards while .1 Mil shifts your position of impact (POI) about .36-inch. The important takeaway here is obvious, the incremental values of MOA and Mil are not the same. Again, at closer distances, the problem won’t matter much. Unfortunately, at longer distances, reticles, their subtension values and their focal plane really do matter. Make sure, on a fundamental level that your turret adjustment type (Mil or MOA) actually match your reticle (Mil or MOA). Moreover, determine whether you need a first- or second-focal-plane optic.

Green and red illuminated mil-dash reticle by Sightmark
With mil-dash, precisely identifying the center of one line to the next for accurate, reliable and repeatable holdover is quick and easy.

The difference in focal planes is easy to understand in terms of magnification. On a second-focal-plane system, adjusting magnification does not change the size of the reticle. Increasing or decreasing magnification does not change your reticle size. The problem? The incremental measurements of the subtensions are not consistent. Generally, the appropriate MOA increment (1.047-inches) is only true at one magnification, either at the highest setting or at a power annotated by a mark.

Conversely, first-focal-plane reticles do increase and decrease commensurate with the optic’s full range of magnification. As a result, the subtension values on a first-focal-plane reticle are consistent no matter the magnification power setting. The result is reliable adjustability at all known distances, as well as the added benefit of stadiametric-type ranging based on the target size and fact that subtension values never change. For this difference alone, my money is on a first-focal-plane system for long range… and for me, the Mil (MRAD) adjustment and reticle system. To that end, however, there is another critical reticle feature when considering milliradian-based optics—Mil-dot and Mil-dash. So, which is better?

While some might suggest it depends on your shooting, my take is—not so much. Unless you’re trying to find that sweet spot of balance between speed and precision, or have trouble identifying fine subtension lines, mil-dash is a better option every day of the week and twice on Sundays, especially as you extend your distance game and, depending on the focal plane, increase magnification. When it comes to accuracy, the greatest threat to precision shot placement, as it relates to this topic, is a mil-dot covering more of your target face. At best, your potential accuracy is only as small as the area of your target covered up by the obstructive black dot while a fine mil-dash subtension line essentially leaves your entire target face unobstructed. The area a mil-dash covers is essentially negligible.

three riflescopes
The Citadel line of riflescopes is designed for long-range precision shooting and competition.

Subtensions also are used for holdovers and are measured from the center of one line to the next. With mil-dash, precisely identifying the center of one line to the next for accurate, reliable and repeatable holdover is quick and easy. With mil-dots, the shooter is left with estimating the center of a mil-dot to the center of the next mil-dot, leaving room for error; moreover, even if you’re using a first-focal-plane reticle, the mil-dot increases in size as you increase magnification—a rather annoying reality when you’re trying to keyhole shots at 100 yards or beat up a 10-in. steel plate at 1,000. Good friend, Sightmark Pro Staff shooter and winner of History Channel’s Top Shot, Season 2, Chris Reed, said it best when he quipped, “You can’t hit it if you can’t see it.”

Unfortunately, while many top competitive shooters and snipers alike prefer first-focal-plane riflescopes with premium glass and mil-dash reticles, they often are quite expensive, running from $2,000 – $4,000. Fortunately, in January 2018, Sightmark introduced two first-focal-plane riflescope lines boasting illuminated mil-dash reticles, Latitude and Citadel. While Latitudes turn heads with an average price point of $800, the new Citadel lineup includes two FFP riflescopes–a 3-18×50 and 5-30×56, both with .1 mil adjustments and red-illuminated mil-dash reticles–averaging a jaw-dropping price point of $479-$516.  Citadel riflescopes even include Sightmark’s lifetime warranty.

Are you a mil-dot/mil-dash type of person or MOA? Tell us which one and why in the comment section.

Sightmark Citadel Riflescopes: Making the Performance Mark

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2018/05/09) – Sightmark’s new Citadel line of premium riflescopes are on-target when it comes to affordable precision performance. Designed as a perfect optic solution for demanding, cost-conscious law enforcement and competitors, Citadel riflescopes are packed with the kind of features traditionally sought after by professional-level shooters. The Citadel riflescope line is comprised of three variable magnification models: 1-6×24 CR1 (SM13038CR1,) 3-18x50LR2 (SM13039LR2,) and 5-30x56LR2 (SM13040LR2.)

three riflescopes
The Citadel line of riflescopes is designed for long-range precision shooting and competition.

All models feature a fine-etched, red-illuminated reticle with 11 brightness settings; premium, fully multi-coated glass for razor-sharp clarity; single-piece, 30mm, 6061-T6 aircraft-grade aluminum tube; throw lever for rapid magnification changes; IP67 waterproof, dustproof, fogproof and shockproof reliability; flip-up lens covers and Sightmark’s lifetime warranty.

Citadel First Focal Plane Riflescopes

Sightmark Citadel 3-18×50 and 5-30×56 riflescopes boast the highly sought after first-focal-plane lens system and illuminated LR2 mil-dash reticles extended-distance competitors desire for consistently precise holdovers at any magnification. Both optics also feature an adjustable, locking diopter, exposed locking turrets, 0.1 mil windage and elevation adjustments, and adjustable parallax. Citadel 3-18×50 and 5-30×56 are great options for long-range recreational plinking, bench rest and F-class competition and PRS matches.

Citadel 1-6×24 Second Focal Plane Riflescope

Perfect for law enforcement, competitive shooters and close- to mid-range hunting, the Sightmark Citadel 1-6×24 Riflescope is built for quick-target-acquisition from up close and personal to hundreds of yards out. The Citadel 1-6×24 features an illuminated CR1 (BDC) reticle calibrated for 55-grain .223 ammunition, capped low-profile turrets and ½-MOA per click windage and elevation adjustability with a total adjustment range on each axis of 120 MOA.

Click here to buy a Citadel riflescope.

Media members interested in learning more about Sightmark products are encouraged to stop by or schedule an appointment by emailing mediarelations@sightmark.com.

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