How to Sight in the Wraith Digital Day/Night Riflescope

Your Wraith digital day/night vision riflescope will need to be zeroed.

What is Zeroing?

Your Wraith digital day/night vision riflescope will need to be zeroed. You are able to do this with the Reticle Zero function in the menu.
Your Wraith digital day/night vision riflescope will need to be zeroed.

Zeroing, or ‘sighting in,’ a scope means aligning your point of aim with the point of impact for the bullet to hit where you want it to. If you don’t sight in your scope, you will likely miss your target. Zeroing is necessary for hunters, long-range precision shooters, competitors and anyone concerned with accuracy.

Sighting in requires a target with bullseye and grid, ammo and plenty of time. To save costs on range fees and ammo, we strongly recommend boresighting your Wraith riflescope with a laser boresight. Boresighting is quick, easy and the most efficient way to get your Wraith digital riflescope close to zero with the ability to get on paper with your first shot.

To learn how to boresight your Wraith scope, click here. 

Once boresighted, you’ll want to head to the range to fire live ammo. (Don’t forget to remove your boresight!) A vise or shooting rest will keep your rifle steady during the sight-in process. This will keep your rifle centered, mitigate recoil and reduce fatigue.

The hole left from a .223 Remington bullet can be small and nearly impossible to see, even from shorter distances—especially if you have poor eyesight. Take a pair of binoculars or a spotting scope with you to identify where you hit on the target. You also may be able to see where you are hitting using the Wraith’s 8x magnification.

Follow these steps to sight in your Wraith Digital Riflescope:

  1. Mount your Wraith riflescope with a comfortable eye relief. (Eye relief is the distance between your eye and the eyepiece on the scope. If you mount your riflescope too close to the rear of your rifle, the recoil of the gun can cause the scope to hit you in the forehead, causing what’s called ‘scope bite,’ resulting in a nasty cut or bruise.)
  2. Turn your Wraith on by pushing down the center button until the Sightmark logo appears.
  3. Adjust both the eyepiece diopter and focus adjustment until you get a crisp, clear image of your target. (The diopter is the measurement of the eye’s curvature. Since people’s eyes are all curved differently, the eyepiece diopter adjustment brings everything on the display screen such as your reticle and menu options into focus.)
  4. Choose your preferred reticle pattern and color in the “Reticle Settings” menu.
  5. Place the center of your reticle as seen through the scope at the center of the target, take 1 to 3 shots.
  6. Tap the center button once to bring up the main menu.
  7. Using the arrows on top of the unit, scroll down to “Reticle Settings” and tap the center button to select.
  8. Use the bottom (down) arrow to scroll to “Reticle Zero.” Press the center button to select this option.
  9. An additional red crosshair—called the red adjustment reticle in the manual—will pop up alongside your chosen reticle. Keep your reticle’s crosshairs pointed to the center of the target.

Note: There will be four sets of numbers displayed on the top of the “Reticle Zero” screen. These numbers represent the reticle’s offset from the center. They are not necessary for the zeroing process but may be useful for readjusting to a known zero if you save these numbers.

  1. Using the up, down, left and right arrows, move the red adjustment reticle to the bullet hole (“point of impact”) group of holes you shot in step 5.
  2. Exit out of the “Reticle Zero” setting by pushing the center button to return to the main screen.
  3. Take another 1 to 3 shots.
  4. Repeat steps 5 through 12 until zeroed. The Wraith is properly sighted in when the point of impact is the same as the point of aim.

Click here to check out the new Wraith digital day/night riflescope.

Accudot Laser Boresights: How to Sight In With a Laser Boresight

Long-range precision shooting takes accurate tools. Accudot laser boresights makes sighting in your rifle quicker and saves ammo
Precision work takes precision tools like Sightmark Accudot boresights.

I don’t know if I would call myself a big-bore guy; I like ‘em small, too. Perhaps “centerfire guy” is more representative of my affinity for larger cartridges of all shapes and sizes, for a multitude of tasks, from personal defense to precision long-range shooting—admittedly, I don’t even spend much time in the .300 Magnum arena although I’ve built a few and am now madly in love with Hornady’s .300 PRC cartridge.

As a gun writer, running the gamut on centerfire cartridges does not come without challenges. Ammo is expensive when you spend quality time on the trigger, especially with new firearms. Out of the box, I spend quite a bit of time sighting-in, seasoning, gathering ballistic and rifle data, and running rigs through whatever paces I feel they are capable of achieving, near or far; as an example, not long ago I took a Lead Star Arms Barrage 9mm Carbine to task at 300 yards, then 400, achieving a 5-inch group at 300 and scoring impacts with 3/5 shots on a 3-MOA steel gong at 400—certainly not the norm but the type of work I subject firearms to when reviewing.

This type of work doesn’t happen within just a box or two of ammo. To be honest, my work generally requires a couple of hundred testing rounds, sometimes exponentially more if I’m really working to achieve true performance results, pushing limits and yes, battling environmental conditions like high winds. Either way, with a lot of lead heading downrange, I can ill afford to blow ammo on incidental tasks like getting on paper and dialing in optics. For initial shots, I depend on true view-through-the-barrel boresighting and optic adjustment and then move immediately into a laser boresighting device.

To be honest, I do occasionally skip the physical look down the barrel and go straight for the laser boresight, depending on time, whether I’ve used the optic on similar rigs and my environment. What do I mean by environment? Sometimes I try to “jump the gun,” so to speak, on range preparation. I’ve been known to install the optic in my home the night before and use a laser boresight on a target across the house—remember, boresighting (and shooting) at 25 yards generally gets you close at 100 yards—the same can be said for 50 yards and 200. If I can achieve a 25-yard boresight the night before, I’m generally on paper with first shots at 100.

One of Us is Not Like Most

While the juice is generally worth the squeeze as a gun writer, in terms of expenses, every expense definitely cuts into my ability to make a living doing what I love. To that end, using fewer materials to complete a project means greater profit—this is Business 101. Of course, I don’t cut corners either. So, saving on ammo, cleaning and maintenance materials, etc. makes both good sense… and cents!

And although I do write about shooting and firearms, most folks do not. There is no profit to be made, only expenses and shooting, whether testing, plinking, hunting or going extreme distances, can be expensive. Of course, expensive is subjective, too. Some might say .22 LR plinking is expensive while others won’t be deterred by the cost of .338 Lapua (and more expensive ammo—take a gander at .50-cal BMG and what it costs to run Cheytac and Tejas cartridges).

Accudot boresights are an improved design which save you money on ammo, batteries and time at the range sighting in your optics.
New Accudot Boresights help you sight-in faster!

At the end of the day, for the vast majority of hardworking folks, expensive is clearly defined when it comes to one cartridge or another, and volume of shooting and I have yet to meet a fan of simply wasting ammo they paid for with cold hard cash. Yes, pretty much EVERYBODY likes to keep cost low. If for nothing else, boresighting reigns supreme when it comes to keeping your shots productive. After all, it doesn’t matter who you are, taking shots with no calls and no splash is no fun, even downright maddening.

Laser Boresights: A Journey

So, what’s the buzz on laser boresights? Looking back at my earliest experiences, the first boresights I used were barrel mounted and troublesome to say the least, even at the high-end of costs. Back then, you-get-what-you-pay-for was still frustrating. Soon after I dabbled in barrel-inserted laser boresights. With a tapered bore rod, these boresights were effectively universal; however, I also fought poor construction—expecting the laser to be installed straight and at center-mass was too tall an order. On the flip side, I also worked with some inexpensive fly-by-night models that seemed to perform well.

Now, years later, I’ve been using in-chamber boresights with great success. Among my personal boresights are Firefield and Sightmark, with Sightmark being the premium option. While in-chamber boresights are caliber specific, many cases are certainly similar enough to cover more than one cartridge with a single in-chamber boresight model—cases in point are .22-250 and 6.5 Creedmoor, as well as .243 Winchester and .308 Winchester, to list a couple.

In-chamber boresights have certainly changed the sight-in landscape for those who have elected to employ them, and certainly as a total, have saved shooters a jaw-dropping wad of cash—there’s no question. With daytime visibility beyond 25 yards, these boresights are sure to get you dialed in close to center-mass and still close to the mark at a 100 sight-in, as explained earlier.

In lower light, if your optic can take it, boresights can certainly stretch out quite a bit farther, say to 50 yards, to close in on that 200-yard zero—100- or 200-yard zero is more or less subjective and one or the other can certainly be beneficial in terms of precision accuracy, depending on factors like load, target distance, etc.

Although Sightmark in-chamber laser boresights have built a solid reputation for accuracy, as evidenced in first-round impacts countless times for shooters at every experience level, there is always room for improvement. As a point of interest here, in-chamber boresight battery life has been a bone of contention for many a shooter. Batteries die at inopportune times and can be cost prohibitive to an annoying fault. Also worthy of mention, depending on your surroundings, fresh batteries may not be the easiest to find. Of course, there’s a light at the end of the Sightmark tunnel and it’s worth talking about.

Click here to learn how to laser boresight your rifle.

 

Accudot laser boresights come in popular hunting calibers, 12 gauge and 9mm.
Accudot laser boresights come in popular hunting calibers, 12 gauge and 9mm.

Accudot Boresights: Sight-in and Save More

The Sightmark Accudot Laser Boresight System, unveiled at the 2019 SHOT Show, was introduced with problem-solving in mind. While the Accudot holds fast to Sightmark’s precision-machined brass case and premium internal components, the device’s internal rechargeable Lithium-Ion battery is definitely a buzzworthy game-changer. In a device where battery life is notoriously short (and batteries are always more expensive than they should be), eliminating the need for replacement batteries is sure to amount to significant savings—for many, the savings are certain to result in recapturing the cost the Accudot entirely.

Even better, since battery life is still battery life even in a rechargeable system, the Accudot features an auto-activation, meaning the laser only activates while the boresight is chambered. One last notable feature is the Accudot’s calibrated diode. The diode ensures precise laser accuracy and doubles up on Sightmark’s boresight commitment to helping people achieve first-shot impacts on paper. No matter how the numbers work out—ammo or batteries—the Accudot’s aim is simply to save you time and money; for some of us, those two words are all too often one in the same.

The Sightmark Accudot Laser Boresight System includes a recharging dock, USB cable, wall adapter and carrying case.

Click here to learn more about Sightmark Accudot boresights.

 

 

 

Sightmark Accudot Boresights: Laser Focused on Accuracy

Accudot boresights are an improved design which save you money on ammo, batteries and time at the range sighting in your optics.
New Accudot Boresights help you sight-in faster!

(Mansfield, TEXAS 2019/02/22) – Sightmark premium Accudot Boresights put an end to guessing games and wasted ammo when sighting-in with fast point-of-impact and point-of-aim identification, even before your first shot.

Designed to handle your gritty firing-line environment and save you a small fortune on batteries, every Accudot boresight features an internal rechargeable battery, auto-on/off functionality and a thick-walled, precision-machined brass case. Every Accudot premium boresight boasts a Class IIIa laser and bullet tip for improved chamber fit and more precise centering. The result? Faster pre-shot alignment, increased first-shot accuracy and less ammo sent downrange.

Sightmark Accudot Boresights are available in several popular rifle calibers, including: .223/5.56 (SM39050); .243, .308, 7.62×54 (SM39051); 9mm (SM39052); .30-06, .270, .25-06 (SM39053); and 12-gauge (SM29054) and include a battery charger.

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Media members interested in learning more about Sightmark products are encouraged to stop by or schedule an appointment by emailing mediarelations@sightmark.com.

Boresighting vs. Zeroing

It’s important for all shooters to learn that boresighting and zeroing in your weapon are not the same thing. Some learn the hard way and end up wasting time, money and ammo before they figure it out. But once you understand a little bit about external ballistics, not only will the difference become simple, but in the meantime, you can also become a better shooter.

What is boresighting?

Boresighting is a method of adjustment to a firearm sight to align the firearm barrel and sights.

What is zeroing?

Zeroing is a method of adjustment to the sights so that the point of aim is the point of impact.

Although you can manually sight the bore yourself, the more modern method to sight in with a laser boresight that either attaches to the muzzle or is inserted into the chamber. The laser will emit a strong enough beam to see up to 100 yards away so you can easily align the bore.

While boresighting will get the scope aligned with the bore, it is not 100% aligned with the point of impact from a bullet, as outside factors such as wind and gravity will affect the trajectory of a flying object. The goal of boresighting is to get on paper. The goal of zeroing is to make the correct adjustments to guarantee the bullet hits where you’re looking.

The goal of boresighting is to get on paper. The goal of zeroing is to hit where you’re looking.

These are both essential steps before you start shooting seriously. Those who don’t boresight their weapon will go out to the field and waste round after round just trying to get on paper because their sights aren’t aligned. Others believe the misconception that boresighting will automatically zero their gun, so they hit a bullseye at 25 yards but are then frustrated that they’re multiple inches off at 100 yards. This happens because they don’t take external ballistics into account.

External ballistics deals with factors affecting the behavior of a projectile in flight.

Once the bullet leaves the barrel, gravity will start to affect its vertical movement, and wind will affect the horizontal movement. The farther your bullet goes, the more it will drop. This is why zeroing your weapon at 100 yards won’t zero it for 200 yards as well. Most firearm optics and sights come with adjustable knobs for elevation and windage for this very reason, and the MOA (Minute of Angle) measurement will tell you how much you need to adjust the scope at a certain yardage.

When you’ve both boresighted and properly zeroed your weapon, you’ll be prepared to shoot any target or game that comes your way.

Click here to buy a Sightmark Boresight.

Boresighting a Pistol

 “When you read about “accuracy” of any given handgun, know that unless machines are involved, what you’re really getting is an indication of that pistol’s ability to be shot accurately. — Tom McHale Shooting Illustrated

When we say a pistol is ‘accurate,’ we mean it consistently hits where we aim. A lot goes into whether a gun is accurate. The barrel, fittings and how precisely-machined all the parts affect accuracy. The sighting system affects accuracy. But we can’t blame all accuracy issues on the pistol. Most accuracy problems originate with you, the shooter. If you have the fundamentals of pistol shooting down—your aim, stance, grip and how you manipulate the trigger—than you should be shooting pretty darn straight. If you are still having problems punching holes into holes from a self-defense distance (10 feet and under), there just might be an issue with the gun.

So, where do you begin?

Inserting a laser boresight into a Ruger pistol
Increase your accuracy with Sightmark’s in-chamber boresights.

Let’s start by inspecting the sighting system you have on your gun—iron sights, night sights, lasers and red dots all need sighting-in to make sure they are aligned properly. Surprisingly, a lot of us just compensate our aim to match that of our gun’s sights from the factory. For example, if your sights are off, which they could very well be, we simply just shoot low left, or high right—whichever way your sights are set—to hit bullseye. It is not good to compensate our aim for offset optics or sights.

Why does accuracy matter?

To stop a threat, you must be able to hit vital organs. Inaccuracy could mean the bad guy wins.

What Happens to Your Body During a Self-Defense Shooting

When we are faced with a threat, our bodies dump adrenaline, norepinephrine and cortisol into our bloodstream, preparing us to either stay and fight or run. Our heart rate, blood pressure and breathing increase, our pupils dilate and our muscles tense. This dump of hormones can cause memory problems, loss of hearing and create tunnel vision.

In a self-defense situation, you won’t be able to take your time to aim. You won’t focus on the front sight. That is why we put lasers, red dots and high-visibility aftermarket sights on our handguns. Anytime we get a new handgun or a new sighting system, we need to make sure our sights or optic is centered with the bore. This makes your gun more accurate. An in-chamber boresight is a perfect way to do this and saves you time and money.

What is a Laser Boresight?

Zero your pistol from 15-100 yards.

A laser boresight is a preliminary method of getting your sights dialed in without using a lot of ammo at the range. Using a laser diode, it projects a red dot on a target, making it easier for you to center your sights and optics. Sightmark’s pistol boresights are caliber-specific and placed directly in your firearm’s chamber.

How to Boresight a Pistol

Using a pistol boresight is simple.

  1. Unload your firearm and pointing it in a safe direction, stabilize it using a benchrest or shooting bags.
  2. Hang a target 15 to 25 yards out.
  3. Unscrew the bottom of the boresight and insert the batteries according to the instructions. The boresight automatically turns on when the batteries are inserted correctly.
  4. Put the laser boresight into the chamber.
  5. Close the slide.
  6. Line the laser beam on to the center of the target.
  7. Look through your optic and using your windage and elevation knobs, adjust the crosshairs or dot until it lines up with the dot of the laser boresight. If you do not have an optic and just want to calibrate your sights, aim as you would regularly and then use a pistol sight adjustment tool to correct for windage and elevation.

As mentioned above, most inaccuracy problems can’t be blamed on the gun. There are a few things we can do besides improving our own technique to help increase accuracy. Accuracy isn’t just for precision shooters or competitors. Accurate is something we must all aim to be. For a small price to pay and a few minutes, a laser boresight might just make all the difference.

Pick your laser boresight out by clicking here.

Do you have any tips on how to improve accuracy? Help other shooters and leave them below in the comment section.

Zero Your Handgun With Sightmark’s New .380 ACP Laser Boresight!

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2018/01/30) – Worry no more, .380 ACP owners—Sightmark has your zeroing needs covered with their redesigned .380 ACP Laser Boresight (SM39046). The perfect tool for boresighting and zeroing your pistol from 15-100 yards, this unit is more compact than the previous model, helping to fit into more compact .380 ACP handguns.

Inserting a laser boresight into a Ruger pistol
Increase your accuracy with Sightmark’s in-chamber boresights.

Far more accurate than a muzzle-attached boresight, the Sightmark .380 ACP Laser Boresight chambers directly in your firearm, just like a normal round, allowing precision accuracy when sighting in. The boresight’s brass construction helps not only with durability, but also improves chambering and ejection. Extremely lightweight and no larger than a standard .380 ACP bullet, this boresight is easily stored for use at the range or ranch. The .380 ACP Boresight provides 1 hour of battery life from two AG5 batteries and includes batteries and a carrying case.

Zero your pistol from 15-100 yards.

How to Boresight a Rifle

When you purchase a new optic for your rifle, that optic is not going to be accurate right out of the box. Before depending on your optic to help you hit exactly where you mean, you’ll have to zero it. Sighting in your scope can take a long time and waste a lot of ammo. Fortunately, there is a solution.

There is a more efficient and faster way of zeroing in a new optic. By using a laser boresight, you save time and money by making sighting-in much faster without using any ammo!

Sighting In With a Laser Boresight

Bore sighting is a reliable way to align your reticle, sights and scope’s crosshairs with the true center of the gun’s barrel—which is the bore. Boresights use a laser diode to project a dot on a target much like a laser pointer, making it easy to see when your crosshairs align with the laser. Since the two run parallel to each other, they can only truly zero at a given distance. This is typically 25 yards.

You can bore sight any firearm—AR-15 and other MSWs, shotgun, bolt-action, and handguns. Bore sighting also works on any sighting system—red dot, reflex, riflescopes, holograph and even your iron or night sights.

There are two different types of laser boresights—one you put directly into the chamber and one you insert into the barrel.

In-Chamber

In-chamber boresights are inserted directly into your gun’s chamber, so they must be caliber-specific and made to the same dimensions and specs as a cartridge in that caliber. These types of boresights are the most accurate. These can, however, become costly If you have firearms in multiple calibers that you need to sight in, because you must purchase a separate boresight for each caliber.

Man inserting a brass-cased in-chamber Sightmark boresight into his AR-15.
In-chamber boresights are accurate and easy to use.

Laser boresight cartridges are easy to use. You simply turn them on and insert it into the chamber of your firearm like you would a live round or snap cap.

Sightmark in-chamber boresights are superior to competitors, due to the multiple set screws that lock in the laser diode, ensuring the laser stays straight and centered. To test an in-chamber boresight’s accuracy, roll your laser boresight on a flat surface, the laser should stay straight along the wall as you roll it. If the dot rotates, you know the diode is canted and you won’t be able to accurately zero-in your scope.

Made of high-quality brass, the Sightmark boresights are calibrated to make sure the laser is true to center, and measure precisely the same specs as a live round. The extensive offerings include 12- and 20-gauge shotgun, the most popular self-defense handgun calibers, and over 30 different hunting, defense, sporting, and popular rifle calibers—including .223/5.56, .308, .50, .300 BLK and 6.5 Creedmoor.

Using an In-Chamber Boresight

  1. Use a benchrest, shooting bags, or other platform that stabilizes your gun. Make sure the firearm is completely unloaded and pointed in a safe direction.
  2. Hang a target 15 to 25 yards out.
  3. Remove the batteries from the boresight packaging and unscrew the bottom of the boresight. Insert the two batteries according to the instructions. The boresight will automatically turn on when the batteries are inserted correctly.
  4. Lock your bolt open to the rear.
  5. Put the laser boresight into the chamber.
  6. You may close the bolt or leave it open.
  7. Line the laser beam on to the center of the target.
  8. Look through your optic and using your windage and elevation knobs, adjust the reticle, dot or crosshairs until it lines up with the dot of the laser boresight.

Universal Boresights

Other boresights are either attached or inserted into the barrel. Most boresights that you must insert into the barrel come with a set of arbors that will modify the boresight to fit different barrel sizes. These types of boresights are the most affordable, but they do come with some disadvantages.

  • Arbors are small and can get lost easily. They also wear out and break.
  • The entire boresight itself can play against the barrel, causing inaccuracy.
  • Safety concerns. Forgetting to remove a boresight from the barrel can result in a catastrophic accident.
Image shows a rifle with a barrel blown up in three pieces, split down the center from a forgotten in-barrel boresight
This barrel blew up when a competitor’s boresight was forgotten inside.

Sightmark’s universal boresights provide a much safer way to boresight if you prefer this type of boresight over an in-chamber boresighter. If you have looked at any firearm failure montages or spent any good deal of time on gun blogs and forums, you have probably seen the blown-up barrel caused by an in-barrel boresight. Our universal laser boresights securely stay on your rifle, shotgun, or pistol via a heavy-duty magnet. Only a small portion of the arbor goes inside the barrel. They incorporate a self-centering arbor, so you never have to worry about losing pieces or breaking parts. They will sight in firearms .17 to .50 caliber.

 

Using the Universal Boresight and Universal Boresight Pro

  1. Use a benchrest, shooting bags, or other platform that stabilizes your gun. Make sure the firearm is completely unloaded and point it in a safe direction.
  2. Hang a target 15 to 25 yards out.
  3. Remove the Universal Boresight from the package. Turn the unit on. To preserve battery life, the Universal Boresight Pro will only activate when the arbor is pressed in when it is attached to the barrel.
  4. Remove any suppressor or muzzle device you have on your firearm.
  5. Simply attach the boresight to the end of the barrel.
  6. Look through your optic and using your windage and elevation knobs, adjust the reticle, dot or crosshairs until it lines up with the dot of the laser boresight.

It’s as easy as that!

Now, you are ready to head to the range to make precise adjustments to your riflescope. It shouldn’t take but a few rounds to zero it in.

You will want to bore sight your firearm any time you get a new optic, upgrade factory sights, for a competition, before hunting, and on a firearm that has been in storage.

Click here to buy boresights from Sightmark.

Do you have questions about boresights? Leave them below and we will do our best to answer them.

Save Your Ammo with Sightmark’s 6.5 Creedmoor Laser Boresight

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2017/11/16) – Nobody likes taking the time to sight-in their rifle. Wasted time and ammo, as well as frustration when fine-tuning, are just a few of the reasons why laser in-chamber boresights are becoming increasingly popular. Perhaps even more popular is the 6.5 Creedmoor rifle cartridge, which is dominating the long-range precision shooting and hunting game. Lucky for those who stay on the forefront of popular cartridges, Sightmark is proud to announce a 6.5 Creedmoor laser boresight (SM39020) that can also be used for .22-250 chambered rifles.

6.5 Creedmoor laser boresight
The new 6.5 Creedmoor boresight will also fit .22-250 rifles.

The quickest way to reliably zero your 6.5 Creedmoor or .22-250 firearm, this laser boresight is inserted into your rifle like a standard cartridge. A red laser shines through the tip of the boresight and out the barrel, allowing shooters to easily align their reticle to the boresight and get on paper for fine adjustments.

The boresight’s brass construction makes it durable and improves chambering and ejection. Since it is the size of a standard cartridge, the Sightmark 6.5 Creedmoor Laser Boresight is easily packed for travel and is extremely lightweight. The boresight is powered by 2x AG5 batteries and includes the appropriate batteries and a carrying case.

 

Sightmark Takes Home the Hardware

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2017/10/19) – Voted on by Optics Planet’s “Hand-Selected Product Experts” the winners of the Optics Planet 2017 Brilliance Awards are in. After competing against tens of thousands of products, Sightmark walked away with two Brilliance Awards in the following categories:

Best Boresighter: Sightmark OPMOD G.U.M.B. Limited Edition Green Universal Boresight

Best Gen 1 Night Vision: Sightmark Ghost Hunter 1×24 Night Vision Goggle Kit

Black, night vision goggle kit
The Ghost Hunter night vision goggle kit wins Optics Planet 2017 Brilliance Award.

Powered by a single CR2 battery, the Optics Planet Exclusive Limited Edition Green Universal Boresight attaches magnetically to the barrel of any size pistol or rifle, saving the shooter money on wasted cartridges and the expense of buying different boresighters for different caliber barrels.

Sightmark’s Ghost Hunter 1×24 Goggle Kit was chosen to be Optics Planet best Gen 1 Night Vision Goggle due to its ability to deliver high-quality image and resolution. The Sightmark Ghost Hunter 1×24 from Sightmark is equipped with a head mount for comfortable, long-lasting, hands-free operation. Safeguards include an automatic shut-off when exposed to bright light sources, ensuring years of operation and its built-in IR illuminator comes in handy when natural ambient light is not enough. Of course, both units are backed with Sightmark’s hassle-free Lifetime Warranty.

 

Sightmark Unveils 10th Anniversary Boresight Kit

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2017/08/01) – In celebration of a full decade of improving accuracy and enriching the shooting experiences of professionals and enthusiasts alike, Sightmark is excited to unveil a limited edition 10th Anniversary Laser Boresight Kit. This brilliantly polished stainless-steel set not only looks great on a desk, the boresights are fully functional and cover a wide range of popular calibers.

Bright, polished stainless steel boresight kit for 9mm to 12-gauge shotguns
The polished stainless steel boresight kit is a limited edition.

The all-new Sightmark 10th Anniversary Laser Boresight Kit (SM39045) includes in-chamber devices, each powered by 2x AG5 or 3x AG3 batteries, for 9mm handguns; .223/5.56, .243, .25-06, .270 .30-06, .308 and 7.62×54-cal. centerfire rifles; and 12-gauge shotguns. While the kit is compact and lightweight, the distinctive high-gloss, black-finish decorative display case is perfect for your desk or display cabinet until a little range time calls these boresights into action. Each boresight includes a red <5mW laser and on/off end cap to save on battery life.

Sightmark pioneered in-chamber boresights and the brand is still a trusted favorite when sighting in. From .17 HMR up to 12-gauge shotgun, Sightmark’s boresights are sure to get you on target faster while saving you money on ammo.

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