Sightmark Adds to the Citadel Family

Sightmark Citadel long-range riflescopes give you more than you pay for in features, quality and clarity.

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2019/01/23) – Sightmark expands the Citadel riflescope family with the addition of the Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 riflescope. This premium riflescope is designed for hunters, medium-to-long range shooting, competition shooters and law enforcement.

The Citadel 3-18x50 LR1 reticle features ¼ MOA click adjustments at 100 yards and a first focal plane reticle.
The Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 reticle features ¼ MOA click adjustments at 100 yards and a first focal plane reticle.

The Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 (SM13039LR1) features a 6x optical system giving you a wide magnification to shoot medium-to-long range, fully multi-coated lens system, exposed pop-up locking turrets and a red illuminated reticle with 11 brightness settings for contrast against targets. The Citadel is IP67 waterproof, shockproof, dustproof, fogproof and comes complete with flip-up covers, throw lever and a sunshade cover.

A reticle widely used in shooting sports across North America, a first focal plane reticle means the dimensions of the reticle are true to any magnification, thus range finding and performing holdovers can be done at any magnification. The Citadel 3-18×50 LR1 reticle features ¼ MOA click adjustments at 100 yards.

Unveiling the New Standard in Digital Riflescopes: Wraith

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2019/01/22) – Sightmark introduces the Wraith Digital Riflescope: the future, in high definition. The 4-32x50mm Wraith digital riflescope is a revolutionary, new high-definition optic designed in Texas by hunters, for hunters.

The new Wraith digital high-definition riflescope from Sightmark has 10 different reticles and 9 color choices.
Introducing the new Wraith digital HD riflescope.

The advanced 1920×1080 HD sensor provides full-color clarity in daytime; simply hit the left arrow to enable night mode with classic emerald or black and white viewing options. An included 850nm IR illuminator provides enhanced image brightness and accurate target acquisition to an astounding 200 yards. Notably, the IR is removable for hunters who live in states where emitted light is illegal.

The Wraith allows (and Sightmark encourages) onboard recording and video export so your favorite moments can be shared with your friends and family on your favorite social media platform.

The Wraith also includes:

  • Memory slot for up to 64GB storage
  • Customizability, with 10 reticle options and 9 color choices
  • 4 hours of battery life from 4 common AAs
  • MicroUSB port for external power
  • 4-32 optical magnification; 1-8x digital zoom

Sightmark to Make Its Mark at the Great American Outdoor Show 2019

(MANSFIELD, TX 2019/01/21) – Sightmark is ready to make its mark at the NRA’s Great American Outdoor Show 2019! Enjoy the Great American Outdoor Show with your family and friends, scheduled for February 2 – 10, at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Stop by booth #647 where Sightmark will display their top-of-the-line optics, attachments and accessories at this year’s show at like the new Core Shot A-Spec reflex sight and Latitude riflescopes.

Core Shot A-Spec

The Core Shot A-Spec bridges the gap between a full-sized and mini reflex sight while bringing precision and reliability to your AR and SBR. The mid-compact sized optic features a scratch-resistant lens coating, wide lens for quick target acquisition, eight reticle brightness levels with digital switch controls and night vision compatibility. Sightmark will offer two models, an FMS and LQD mount, while both will include an AR riser and low-profile mount.

Latitude

Designed specifically for long-range competition shooting, Sightmark’s Latitude line includes five long-range scopes with robust 4:1 zoom ratio, fully multi-coated scratch-resistant glass, green/red illuminated reticle options, locking fast-focus eyepiece, external zero-stop ring and oversized turrets. The five models are 10-40×60 F-Class (SM13044FTR), 10-40×60 Benchrest (SM13044BR), 6.25-25×56 F-Class (SM13042FTR), 6.25-25×56 PRS (SM13042PRS) and 8-32×60 F-Class (SM13043FTR).

 About GAOS

The Great American Outdoor Show celebrates outdoor traditions enjoyed by millions in the United States of America. Over 1,000 exhibitors will showcase their products, ranging from guided hunts and fishing gear to firearms and accessories, all in a 650,000 square foot exhibit hall. Apart from the trade show, GAOS will also host country concerts, fundraising dinners, speaking events and many more fun events! For more information visit greatamericanoutdoorshow.org.

Open or Tube Reflex Sights—Which Type of Red Dot Sight Should I Buy?

The red dot sight is extremely compatible with AR-15s and other Modern Sporting Rifles (MSR) and is the optic of choice for most MSR owners. These sights are the fastest way to get on target accurately and for AR shooters, this is exactly what we need. Unless you are precision shooting at longer ranges, fast target acquisition and a shot that hits where you aim are all you need in competition shooting, plinking, home defense and even predator and varmint hunting. The reflex or red dot sight is the way to go for close quarters (CQB) to medium ranges, where speed is your top priority.

Before we continue, we need to get something straight—a “red dot sight” has become the term most use when referring to a non-magnified electronic sight that projects an illuminated dot (or other shapes) reticle on a target. However, the term is used incorrectly.

 

Sightmark Core Shot A-Spec FMS red dot sight
This is not a red dot sight. It is an open reflex sight.

 

 

And this is a tube red dot sight.

Both open and tube sights are reflex sights, but an open reflex sight is technically not a red dot sight.

Now, most people aren’t going to make fun of you if you refer to either as a red dot sight and will know exactly what you’re talking about, but since we (Sightmark) make both reflex and red dot sights, we’re nerdy about them and use the correct terms.

Open and tube reflex sights operate the same way. This is how they are set apart from holographic and prismatic sights—which aren’t actually red dot or reflex sights at all.

Reflex sights are called so because of the way they work. They work by using a reflective glass lens to align light from an LED to project an aiming point on a glass objective lens. Due to a special reflective coating on the lens, the illuminated red dot is visible only to you and does not go through the other side of the lens. The dot is never actually projected on the target, it only appears that way to the viewer.

Reflex sights, due to their heads-up display (HUD) design allow for a wider field of view.
Reflex sights, due to their heads-up display (HUD) design allow for a wider field of view.

The internal operation is the same for tube red dot and reflex sights; however, when you put a tube red dot sight and a reflex sight next to each other (as shown above,) they look nothing alike. Both are excellent optics with very few disadvantages, yet they do have slightly different specs and features that might make you prefer one over the other.

Reflex and tube dot sights are non-magnified (as mentioned above,) have an unlimited eye relief—meaning you can mount it anywhere along your rail without the worry of scope bite—and work on the Bindon Aiming Concept, meaning you shoot using the sight with both eyes open.

One of the biggest differences between a reflex/open sight and a red dot is the field of view. Reflex sights, due to their heads-up display (HUD) design allow for a wider field of view. The field of view is how much of the image you can see in the window or objective lens. Reflex sights let you clearly see the target as well as what’s around it, giving you a tactical advantage by allowing you to retain your situational awareness.

Reflex sights are also just a hair faster at target acquisition because the dot isn’t as confined in the head’s up display as in the tube style. Some might find, especially competitors or those hunting birds, that peripheral vision is obstructed or limited using a tube red dot sight when transitioning targets.

Reflex sights are more susceptible to the elements, though. Red dots have an enclosed housing protecting the internals. Also, reflex sights have an exposed light path so if anything blocks that path, you lose the reticle. To compensate for this, we’ve added an extendable hood on our new M-Spec reflex sight to help reduce the risk of losing your reticle.

Where the tube red dot has the reflex beat is how bright the reticle is compared with reticles on open sights.

For which one is better, I can’t tell you. Our military uses both tube and open sights, so both have their place. Depending on your usage and firearm, you will find that you prefer one over the other. As a general rule, most people put a tube red dot on their shotguns, a mini reflex sight on their handguns and either on their AR-15.

Which type of sight do you prefer? Tell us which one and why in the comment section.

Click here to shop Sightmark reflex and red dot sights. 

Sightmark is Set to Make its Mark at SHOT 2019!

SHOT Show logo(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2019/01/11) – If you’re planning to attend SHOT Show 2019, stop by booth #11924 and visit with Sightmark! SHOT is scheduled for January 22 – 25 at the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. Don’t miss out on your chance to see the superior optics Sightmark will be unveiling at this year’s show!

Experience Sightmark products like the Ultra Shot RAM Series reflex sights along with the Citadel and Latitude Riflescope series. While visiting, you’ll have the opportunity to win some cool swag like can coolers, hats and pens through an air gun challenge featuring real recoil.

RAM Series Reflex Sights

Sightmark Ultra Shot RAM Series reflex sights feature three available models: R- (SM26031), A- (SM26032) and M-Spec (SM26034 & SM26035), creating a resilient close-range optic for target shooting, law enforcement and military. A broad lens speeds up target acquisition while maintaining a wide field of view with an advanced anti-reflective and scratch-resistant lens system.

Accudot Boresight

The next generation boresight is coming to a dealer near you! Sightmark Accudot Boresights are more efficient when zeroing your firearm. Simply place the boresight within the chamber for more precise sighting than your normal barrel-attached boresights. Accudots are built from durable brass while featuring a calibrated diode for increased accuracy and include an internal rechargeable lithium-ion battery.

Latitude

Sightmark’s Latitude line includes five long-range scopes with robust 4:1 zoom ratio, fully multi-coated, scratch-resistant glass, green/red illuminated reticle options, locking fast-focus eyepiece, external zero-stop ring and oversized turrets. The five models are 10-40×60 F-Class (SM13044FTR), 10-40×60 Benchrest (SM13044BR), 6.25-25×56 F-Class (SM13042FTR), 6.25-25×56 PRS (SM13042PRS) and 8-32×60 F-Class (SM13043FTR).

About SHOT Show

SHOT Show is the largest trade show and exhibit for shooting sports, hunting and outdoor accessories. This is your best opportunity to explore manufacturers product lines in addition to their latest product from over 2,000 exhibitors. Talk with suppliers and customers to expand your business and knowledge to improve your sales.

 For more information about SHOT Show 2019, visit shotshow.org.

Sightmark is set to Make its Mark at DSC 2019!

Come see Sightmark at booth #4153 at the DSC 2019 and get hands-on with our new optics!
Come see Sightmark at booth #4153 at the DSC 2019!

(MANSFIELD, TEXAS 2019/01/07) – Sightmark is excited to attend the 2019 Dallas Safari Club Convention and Sporting Expo, scheduled for January 17 – 20, at the Kay Bailey Hutchinson Center. Sightmark will turn heads with its continuous growth and innovative sights, lasers, night vision and accessories.

If you plan to attend the 2019 Dallas Safari Club Convention and Sporting Expo, please take the opportunity to stop by booth #4153, visit with the staff and learn more about Sightmark products which enhance professional and recreational users in hunting and shooting sports.

About DSC

Active since 1972, the Dallas Safari Club has been the union point for hunters, conservationists and wildlife enthusiasts. The international organization offers members a variety of options: annual conventions and expos, annual sporting clay events, monthly meetings, world-class publications and a grant-in-aid program that contributes millions of dollars each year to programs and projects that promote their mission to conserve wildlife and lands while educating the youth and public and protect the rights and interest of hunters worldwide. For more information visit www.biggame.org.

 

 

Cant IS a Word in Long Range Shooting

When it comes to long-range shooting, luck is most decidedly not in the cards. Lobbing hundreds of rounds down range and employing some semblance of Kentucky is sure to result in a hit or two somewhere in the mix—it certainly doesn’t demonstrate one’s ability to tackle precision shooting…or maybe it does—but not in a good way. At the risk of raining on someone’s parade, using volume of fire to ring long-range steel does nothing to showcase marksmanship unless that volume is put into practice, not raining lead hoping something hits.

Long-range shooting takes skill and practice but also the right rig. Using Sightmark’s bubble level ring helps with cant.
It takes skill and practice to shoot long-range. A Sightmark bubble level ring helps, too.

To be clear, a shooter’s skill, rig, ballistic and environmental conditions either combine to score a hit at distance or not. Some latitude may apply, good or bad, in any of those long-range shooting elements; however, where weaknesses reside, greater strengths in other areas must compensate—weather conditions may be worse one day while the rig and ammunition capabilities are essentially fixed variables. This means a stronger skill set is required to compensate for the weakness in environmental attributes, i.e. wind, rain, etc.

Fortunately, while some elements like your rig and ammo may be unchangeable on the firing line, they certainly can be strengthened to enhance your skill set and overall accuracy, the use of a cant indicator as an example. Cant is a silent long-range killer, responsible for lack of accuracy more than people care to talk about… and more often than not, people don’t talk about it at all. In a world of cause and effect, perhaps they don’t talk about it because they’ve never been talked to about it and now, here we are talking about it. At close- to mid-range, including those gangster kill shots you see on TV, may not make much of a difference but stretch your shooting to respectable distances and it can quickly become a problem.

Marine Corps snipers not only talk about cant, but they are also trained to understand its effect and correct it; in fact, the Marine Corps sniper addresses it pretty directly, stating just 1 degree of cant shifts point of impact as much as 6 inches at 1,000 yards. Six inches may not seem like much but it can easily mean the difference between success and catastrophic failure at long-range, especially when you consider those other pesky variables like wind, humidity, altitude, spin drift, the shooter’s skill set and yes, the capabilities of both rifle setup and ammo.

The bubble level rings provides cant information to help you be as accurate as possible.
The Sightmark bubble level ring has a highly visible center line for accuracy.

Six inches may just be six inches or compounded with other issues that take you off target altogether (and may be have been a hit given the shooter got those six inches back.) Precision military shooting aside, ask a competitive long-range shooter chasing points on a target face if six inches matters—believe me, it does. There’s a reason Scott McRee, owner of McRees Precision and the producer of world-class precision rifle chassis, embeds a patented M-Lev cant indicator in each of his stocks. It’s important stuff.

Fortunately, somewhere between going without and buying one of McRee’s chassis, a much more affordable option can certainly be had in rail or optic-mounted cant indicators. The Sightmark Bubble Level Ring is a perfect solution, offering precision cant-indicator accuracy, rugged reliability, simple installation, a lifetime warranty and a price point you simply can’t ignore.

Sightmark offers the aircraft-grade aluminum Bubble Level Ring in 30mm and 34mm sizes for quick, single-bolt attachment to your riflescope with evenly disbursed pressure. At the heart of this simple, effective cant indicator lies an embedded horizontal bubble level complete with a high visibility center-line. When mounted, the Bubble Level Ring provides instant moment-of-truth cant information to ensure your shots are as accurate as your skill, environmental conditions, ballistics and the rest of your rig’s capabilities allow. At 1,000 yards, the value in getting six inches back can be, well, invaluable—quite a trade-off considering MSRP on the Sightmark Bubble Level Ring is just $23.99 and includes a lifetime warranty. But what do I know? I’m just an aging Devil Dog with a passion for going long with lead.

The Bubble Level Ring is available in 30mm and 34mm.

Click Here for the 30mm and Click Here for the 34mm.

Where Should I Mount my Reflex Sight?

One of the most popular accessories for the AR (and other MSRs) is the red dot or reflex sight. And for good reason…they help you get on target quickly for accurate shot placement in competition and in self-defense and tactical situations. In fact, I’m betting it’s probably one of the first things you’re considering adding to your new build.

There are a lot of different reflex sights to choose from. But regardless, whether you decide to go with an open reflex sight or closed tube red dot sight, mounting either optic is the same.

Fortunately, reflex sights don’t require much of a learning curve to master. They don’t magnify, so there’s no adjusting for distance. It’s pretty much mount, zero and go.

Sightmark Ultra Shot Pro Spec NVG QD and XT-3 Tactical Magnifier mounted to a patrol rifle
The Sightmark Ultra Shot Pro Spec NVG QD and new XT-3 Tactical Magnifier are a great combo.

Unlike traditional riflescopes, reflex sights have an unlimited eye relief, so there is no right or wrong place to mount your sight. Further, your target and your dot stay the same size no matter where you put your sight on your rifle. Technically, you can put it anywhere along the rail your little heart desires. With that being said, most people strongly suggest you keep it mounted on the receiver part of the rail and not the handguard part of the rail. Now, there are placements that might raise a few eyebrows—like as close to the barrel as possible—but don’t worry, you aren’t going to look like a tool even if your sight is in the most extreme forward position. As Ryan Gresham points out the video below, Scout rifle (without free-float rails) shooters prefer this position.

Even though I say there is no right or wrong answer to this question, you will find that a little further back than center is the most common placement of a reflex sight. Seems like for most, the sweet spot is above the ejection port. Why is this? The further away from the stock, the less balanced the rifle feels and the more likely your sight won’t stay zeroed.

There are advantages to both forward and backward positioning of your reflex sight. Forward is closest to the muzzle, while backward is closest to your face.

The further away from your eye you mount your sight, the smaller the window appears. This might make it more difficult to find the illuminated red dot reticle. (Like everything in the gun industry, though, some will argue the opposite.) However, you will be able to see way more of your surroundings allowing you to retain a high level of situational awareness and see more potential threats. The closer you mount your red dot to your eye, the wider field of view your optic provides but you lose the situational awareness.

Or, if you have a magnifier, you will need to mount your reflex sight forward enough to leave room for the magnifier.

Ryan Gresham from Gun Talk explains red dot mounting in the video below.

At the end of the day, it is what makes you the most comfortable, confident and accurate. Experiment with different placement and you’ll find the best mounting position for you.

Do you already have a reflex sight? Tell us where you have it mounted in the comment section.

Click here to Shop Sightmark reflex sights.

Sightmark M-Spec Mini Red Dot Sight Review

Written by Jamie Trahan, 18-year Law Enforcement Officer and Sightmark Pro Staff Member

At one point in time, people used rocks and spears to hunt. Then, according to historians, way more knowledgeable than I, gunpowder was invented in ancient China. The earliest written reference to a mixture of three powders possibly describing gunpowder was found in the 142 AD Cantong Gi text Book of the Kinship of Three written by alchemist Wei Boyang.

The first firearms, like basic designs such as the fire lance, were developed long after this text was written. The oldest surviving firearm is the Heilongjiang hand cannon dated to 1288, which centuries later developed into the matchlock, and later, the flintlock and eventually cartridge-based firearms.

This hand cannon is thought to date back to 1271, making it older than the Heilongjiang hand cannon. This ancient Yuan dynasty firearm hand cannon is thought to date back to 1271, making it older than the Heilongjiang hand cannon—the oldest know surviving firearm.
This hand cannon is thought to date back to 1271, making it older than the Heilongjiang hand cannon.

Despite many other issues, the Achilles heel of the first firearms were the smooth bore and lack of sighting systems. Eventually, some of these problems were remedied with the invention of the first primitive sights circa 1450 and rifling in 1498 in Germany. Although not commonplace until much later, the ideas were there.

Fast forward to 1975 to the birth of the red dot sight when the first electronic sight was marketed by Aimpoint AB in Sweden. That’s the humble beginnings of the modern red dot sight. It was large, it was bulky, but since then, red dot sights have gone micro.

Now, let me introduce you to one of the smallest red dot sights on the market—the Sightmark Mini Shot M-Spec. Don’t let the size fool you, it’s designed to take a beating and keep on going.

Here is what the people at Sightmark have to say about it:

“Built for law enforcement officers and professionals, the compact Mini Shot M-Spec Reflex Sight is the perfect optic for competition shooting, hunting and LE applications on shotguns, pistols and AR’s. The kit includes a low-profile mount for shotguns and pistols along with a riser mount for AR platform rifles. This rugged optic is 100% waterproof and features a durable aluminum housing with a steel protective shield. Doubling the battery life of the competition, the Mini Shot M-Spec’s extremely low-power consumption provides 300 to 30,000 hours of battery life on one CR1632 battery, while its 12-hour auto shutoff prevents the unit from running out of batteries while you’re not using it. Easy windage and elevation click adjustments make zeroing the 3 MOA red dot reticle a breeze, even without any special tools. Ten brightness levels give shooters perfect reticle options from low-light situations to the brightest days. An ambidextrous digital switch allows the M-Spec to be easily turned on and off by both left- and right-handed shooters.”

The primary features are:

  • 100% waterproof and dustproof
  • Up to 30,000-hour battery life on lowest setting
  • Steel protective shield
  • 3 MOA red dot reticle
  • 10 reticle brightness levels
  • 2-night vision brightness settings

I received the Mini Shot as a part of the Wolfhound 6×44 HS-223 Prismatic Sight with Mini Shot M-Spec Reflex Sight combination unit. With the removal of a couple of screws, I was able to remove the Mini Shot M-Spec from the Wolfhound and mount it on my GLOCK 17 within a couple of minutes. The M-Spec mini reflex sight mounts easily, the buttons feel perfect and the red dot is bright and crisp.

Easy windage and elevation click adjustments on the Sightmark Mini Shot M-SPEC mini red dot pistol sight make zeroing the 3 MOA red dot reticle a breeze
The M-Spec mini dot has a 3 MOA dot perfect for close-up to mid-range work.

On the range, the weight of the Mini Shot isn’t noticeable, and the small size mates easily with my issued GLOCK 17. Speaking of mounting—one of the questions that I had when these first came to market was the mounting system. It is the same mounting pattern as the Docter optic, which is Plate 01 on the GLOCK MOS system. 

I am a glutton for punishment when it comes to sighting in a red dot on a pistol. I don’t use a sandbag or a rest to dial it in—which for me is at 10 yards. Shoot, adjust, shoot, adjust…. until the round hits the mark. While it’s not the most technically proficient method, it’s more fun—at least for me with 9mm being as cheap as it is now.

Once the sight was set, and the brightness of the dot was adjusted where I wanted it, it was time for a few drills. One of which a red dot equipped pistol excels at is the infamous Dot Torture originally designed by David Blinder. The version I typically use is the variant designed by Todd Green, which provides the directions below each dot…. much easier for me to follow.

Click here to download your free TDA Dot Torture drill target.

I didn’t run the drill for time, I ran it at 4 yards (12 feet) and ran it clean, which proved the accuracy of the sight for me.

Without a doubt, this sight is a steal at $199 MSRP, and its closest comparison in the market is the Vortex Venom. However, the Mini Shot M-Spec comes in at 13% lower price point and offers double the battery life on the highest setting over the Venom. That’s more ammo for more trigger time and training, which is one of the most important things in the shooting world.

The mini shot M-Spec is the perfect size for the GLOCK 17 and the weight isn't noticeable.
The mini shot M-Spec is the perfect size for the GLOCK 17 and the weight isn’t noticeable.

I have previous experience with the Trijicon RMR, Burris Fastfire 2/3, Vortex Venom and now the Mini Shot M-Spec. What I can tell you after finally getting my hands on the Mini Shot, is that you shouldn’t fall for some of the other companies’ hype. That isn’t Sightmark. Sightmark designs the same products, giving you the same features, if not more features, at a lower price point.

All said and done, the Mini Shot M-Spec will find a permanent home on my duty GLOCK. Unfortunately, just not the one I had for review. After a few days on the GLOCK, it had to get put back on the Wolfhound and sent back home to Texas.

That reminds me, it proudly wears the stars and bars on its left side with “Designed in Texas, USA,” which I think is neat as half of my bloodline hailing from the Lone Star State.

Author’s note:

One thing to emphasize. The Mini Shot M-Spec also has a 12-hour auto-shutoff feature to help with that wonderful battery run time. When you find your optic turned off when you know you’d left it on, don’t panic and start looking for another battery—Sightmark has you covered.

Click here to check out and buy the Mini Shot.

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